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  • Jul 24, 2017
    Taipei Rights Workshop, Summer 2017 Edition
    by Books from Taiwan

    During the last week of June, we welcomed a group of friends from Thailand and Vietnam along with the steaming hot summer air. In cooperation with Books from Taiwan, Taiwanese publishers grasped this rare chance to impress our guests with interesting stories and beautifully made books.

     

     

  • Jul 17, 2017
    Seoul International Book Fair 2017
    by Books from Taiwan

    The theme of SIBF 2017 is Meta-morphosis, which did take place—thanks to the effort of the new President of Korean Publishers Association, more large publishing groups and even independent bookstores participated. However Books from Taiwan had two full days of back-to-back meetings (isn’t it a good sign?) and hardly had the time to walk around the Fair… Still we managed to take some photos.

     

  • Jul 17, 2017
    BFT in Bangkok and Bologna
    by Books from Taiwan

    Books from Taiwan completed its first back-to-back book fair trip to Bangkok (March 29-31) and Bologna (April 3-6). We were delighted to witness the Taiwan Pavilion made its comeback to the Bangkok International Book Fair after ten years, and to give a presentation on BFT’s main task and the translation fund program to a group of Thailand publishers on March 31.

     

  • Mar 16, 2017
    Books from Taiwan - Issue 5
    by Books from Taiwan

    The fifth issue of BFT’s catalogue is hot off the press! In this biannual publication, we feature a select list of works, ranging from fiction and non-fiction titles, children’s books and comics.

     

     

     

    Adults & Children’s Books

     

    Hometown at Dusk by Roan Ching-Yueh

    Once Upon a Time in Hong Kong by Ma Ka-Fai

    Burning Bright by Cheng Ying-Shu

    Aaron the Fox by Wang Mei-Hui & Chen Pin-Rui

    Little Things I, II by Jay Yeh, Bei Lynn, Tsui Li-Chun, Yang Li-Ling, Chien Yin, Tai Pera, Yu Chia-Chi, Ho Yun-Tzu, Claire Cheng, Tsai Chia-Hua, Li Yi-Ting

    The Squirrel and the Banyan Tree by Zhou Jian-Xin

    Silhouettes by Sun Hsin-Yu

    Adventure at Night by Liao Shu-Ti

    I Want Some! and Do You Want Some? by Huang Yu-Chin & Tsao Juei-Chih

     

    Download Issue 5 here.

     

    Comics

     

    Rites of Returning by Zuo Hsuan

    The Taming of the Warrior by You Gui-Xiu

    Scroll of a Northern City II by AKRU

    Oldman by Chang-Sheng; Big City, Little Things by HOM

    Son of the Sea by Chen Jian; Oh, My Goddess! by Chiyou

    The Baker’s Journey by Chen Wen-Sheng; Remote Island by Adoor Yeh

    Bonjour Angoulême! by Au Yao-Hsing

     

    Download Issue 5 Comics here.

     

     

  • Mar 15, 2017
    Monthly Pick: ONCE UPON A TIME IN HONG KONG
    by Books from Taiwan

    For March we recommend you the award-winning novel Once Upon a Time in Hong Kong, an underworld story blended with forbidden love affairs set in a unique time and place in history.

     

     

     

    Ma Ka-Fai

    Category: Literary/Crime

    Publisher: Thinkingdom

    Date: 6/2016

    Pages: 344

    Length: 180,000 characters

    (approx. 110,000 words in English)

     

    Winner of 2017 Taipei Book Fair Award

    Luk Pa-Choi runs to Hong Kong to escape poverty, brutality, and sexual abuse, having no idea that a future just as treacherous awaits him there. The young man begins by pulling a rickshaw and working as a bouncer in brothels, but fate pulls him deeper into the world of the Chinese criminal underground, and he begins to establish himself as a gangster. Yet he has a lover of no small significance – Morris Davidson, an officer in the British police force in Hong Kong. The two feed each other information, and provide each other comfort.
     

    Yet when the Japanese army takes over Hong Kong, and British officers are thrown in jail, Luk Pa-Choi must learn to deal with this new enemy. As his situation becomes more dangerous, Luk faces betrayal and the bitter price of love as he tries his best to rescue Davidson.
     

    Set in the tumultuous period of WWII and Japanese occupation, Once Upon a Time in Hong Kong tells the story of a young Chinese gangster’s dramatic rise in Hong Kong’s underworld and his forbidden love affair with a British police officer. Meticulously researched and artfully told, it is at once a crime epic, a heart-wrenching love story, and a sex-charged spy thriller.

     

    Download English Sample here.

  • Mar 15, 2017
    Taipei Book Fair 2017
    by Books from Taiwan

    The 2017 Taipei Book Fair (Feb 8 to 13) no doubt is the most vibrant ever. More independent publishers attended as exhibitors with brilliant stand designs. More publishers made efforts to connect with their readers by dedicating spaces for hosting book events, rather than making sales. Certainly BFT was there too! Check out our collage of photos and read more on Publishers Weekly.

     

    Taking the Pulse of Taiwan's Book Market

    Children's Titles, Especially Translations, Are Big Deals

     

    Taipei Book Fair

     

  • Jan 04, 2017
    Wu Ming-Yi’s Neo-Realist Communion with the Minute, the Marginal and the Material
    By David Der-Wei Wang. Translated by Darryl Sterk.

    First published on June 28, 2016, United Daily News

    David Der-Wei Wang, Professor of Chinese Literature at Harvard, makes a statement on behalf of the judges.

     

    There were six finalists for the third annual UDN Grand Literary Award, including poets, essayists and novelists, all outstanding representatives of contemporary Taiwan literature who have won our respect and esteem. After detailed discussions, we, the judges, have decided to award the prize to Wu Ming-Yi.

    Wu Ming-Yi began writing Nativist short stories – stories about a rural way of life that was passing away – in the early 1990s, but he really made his mark after the turn of the new millennium with several collections of nature writing: Book of Lost Butterflies (2000), about the decline of butterfly populations in Taiwan over the twentieth century; Butterfly Way (2003), about the multigenerational journeys on which certain species of butterfly still embark today; So Much Water So Close to Home (2007), an homage to Raymond Carver about an epic seaside hike down Taiwan’s East Coast, and Flame Above Flame (2014), a meditation on photography, in which Wu Ming-Yi follows in Roman Vishniac’s footsteps around the old neighborhood of Báng-kah. In these works, Wu Ming-Yi appeals to the environmental ethos of his era, but also reveals a fiercely intellectual streak and resolutely empirical spirit. With the addition of a magical realism to his creative palette, Wu created a style all his own in two novels. First, in Dreamliner (2007), a narcolept follows in his father’s footsteps from Taiwan to Japan at the height of the Pacific War to manufacture fighter props. Second, in The Man With the Compound Eyes (2011), a million eyes watch as a floating trash mountain crashes upon Taiwan’s eastern shore.

    The Magician on the Skywalk (2011) is a collection of nine tales of bildungsroman set in the Chung Hwa Market, where the narrator (and the author) grew up. The market, which was demolished in 1992, and returns to life in these pages, is a habitat for hundreds – small shop owners, diners, families – from all walks of life. It is also a den of thieves, in which each protagonist gets his first bittersweet taste of life. When, later in life, the protagonists look back on their time there, they remember the magician who stood on the skywalk, and finally realize his significance: as unremarkable as he seemed at the time, he presided over rites of passage, leading them down paths less travelled by and initiating them into the ineffable knowledge of adulthood.

    The Stolen Bicycle turns one bicycle into the stuff of legend. With a title that pays tribute to Vittorio De Sica’s Neo-Realist masterpiece Ladri di Biciclette, this story records the quotidian passions of people, flora, and fauna as they undergo modernization – from Japanese colonialization, which ended in the Pacific War, to postwar industrialization under the Kuomintang. As the wheel of fortune turns, the protagonists cycle from Taipei, on Taiwan’s northern tip, to Puli and Gangshan, the mountains of the central interior; from the Malay Peninsula to the jungles of northern Burma, and from one period in Taiwan’s history to another.

    Interspersed among the ten chapters of The Stolen Bicycle are eight excerpts from an archive of notes on bicycle construction and evolution, as well as the narrator’s antique bicycle collection. It is a chronicle of an obsession with a stolen bicycle that contains important clues concerning its recovery, as well as an archaeological record of artifacts and their users as they develop, disappear and reappear. Hardly a typical nature writer, Wu Ming-Yi has extended his empathetic gaze to objects, which he sees in the longue durée of their production, consumption and dilapidation. In so doing, he communes with the minute, the marginal, and the material, and in his communion discovers a method for making sense of the Taiwan experience.

    Wu Ming-Yi’s works have garnered mixed responses. Detractors disparage his narratives as baroque, his novels as kaleidoscopes in which themes get blurred. Supporters appreciate his story-telling skill, and his ability to convey historical memory, both human and environmental. Whether negative or positive, the intensity of the responses testifies to the relevance of his works, which by getting under our skin motivate us to question what fiction should be about and how it should be written. This year’s winner of the UDN Grand Literary Award, Wu Ming-Yi will continue to explore new answers to those questions.

  • Dec 15, 2016
    Recipients of the 2016 Translation Fund Grants!
    Ministry of Culture, Republic of China (Taiwan)

    The Ministry of Culture is delighted to announce the recipients of the 2016 Translation Grant Program! Please see the full list below or click here:

     


     

    Order Applicant Project Title Grant (in NTD)
    1 Text Publishing THE STOLEN BICYCLE English Translation 500,000
    2 ENCICLOPÈDIA CATALANA S.L.U. Sanmao's ”Dreaming the Olive Tree” Spanish translation and publication 400,000
    3 韓哲旻 Dark Tourism through the Rebels’ City - An Alternative Guide for Taipei Korean version Publishing plan 400,000
    4 Camelozampa s.n.c. Translation into Italian of "Kiss and Goodbye" 350,000
    5 mirobole editions WAR OF THE BUBBLES 340,000
    6 L'Asiathèque French translation of The Illusionist on the Skywalk 330,000
    7 Honford Star The Steelyard: The Complete Fiction of Lai He 300,000
    8 Hyundae Munhak  The River Darkens 300,000
    9 ALMA The Illusionist on the Skywalk 280,000
    10 魚住悅子 Badai’s Anjiao Japanese Translation and Publishing Project 250,000
    11 Mangmoom Culture  The Hospital into Thai 250,000
    12 Mangmoom Culture Dangerous Mind into Thai 240,000
    13 Munhakdongne  GRANNY’S FAVOURITE TOY 220,000
    14 思潮社 思潮社翻譯出版《A夢》日文版 200,000
    15 Mi:Lu Publishing Czech translation of Yang Mu´s work 150,000
    16 Fandogamia Editorial, C.B. The Worst Travel to Spain and France 90,000